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Laurier Milton Lecture Series

This season is all about the Power of Ideas!

Get inspired by the latest research, analysis and ideas from some of Laurier's leading academics and staff. Dare to think differently about the world and discover new ideas each month.  Lectures are held on the second Wednesday of every month (October-May). Find details and descriptions for the full season below.

In partnership with Wilfrid Laurier University and Milton Public Library, the Town of Milton proudly presents this lecture series in its ninth year.

Admission is FREE for all lectures - please register to stay up-to-date and recieve reminders before lecture events.

Register now  

2017-2018 Schedule

For more information, contact the Milton Public Library at 905-875-2665.

Lectures & Dates Summary & Speaker

More Information

Forensic Psychology: Crimes Through the Eyes of a Child

October 11, 2017 

7 PM

Location: FirstOntario Arts Centre Milton, 1010 Main Street East, Milton (MinMaxx Hall) 

 

Child eyewitnesses can provide crucial evidence during an investigation and court proceedings. Discover the main issues surrounding child forensic interviewing (e.g., memory, language limitations, suggestibility). How can interviewers maximize their chances of obtaining quality evidence to prosecute those who commit crimes against children?

Full lecture description here...

Presented by

Dr. Kim P. Roberts, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Science

 

Register

 

Making Games to Change the World

November 8, 2017

7 PM

Location: FirstOntario Arts Centre Milton, 1010 Main Street East, Milton (MinMaxx Hall) 

 

Games are powerful.  They can educate, inform, build empathy and awareness. Explore the challenges and techniques used to create board, card and digital games. Discover how live-action games like escape rooms are making a difference in the world.

Full lecture description here...

Presented by

Dr. Scott Nicholson, Department of Game Design and Development, Faculty of Human and Social Sciences

Register

 

 

The Making of General Sir Arthur Currie

December 13, 2017

7 PM

Location: FirstOntario Arts Centre Milton, 1010 Main Street East, Milton (MinMaxx Hall) 

 

Historian Mark Humphries explores how a farm boy from Southwestern Ontario rose to become one of the British Army's most respected generals, as well as the dark secret he feared would destroy his reputation.

Full lecture description here...

Presented by

Dr. Mark Humphries, Department of History, Faculty of Arts

Register

 

Global Climate Change: How Did We Get Here & the Way Out

January 10, 2018 

7 PM

Location: FirstOntario Arts Centre Milton, 1010 Main Street East, Milton (MinMaxx Hall) 

Explore the physical and human dimensions of climate change. How did we get ourselves into this trouble? How is climate change impacting humans? Why are many of us not acting to create change? If we are aware of the likely consequences of inaction, how can we engage people in taking action?

Full lecture description here...

Presented by

Dr. Hind Al-Abadleh, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Science and Dr. Manuel Riemer, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Science

Register

 

 

 

Sharing Love through Community Music

February 14, 2018

7 PM

Location: FirstOntario Arts Centre Milton, 1010 Main Street East, Milton (MinMaxx Hall) 

What is community music? Its origins are attributed to work in the UK, where the intervention of music amongst at-risk youth is a means to creating positive social change. Join Brandon Leis and a panel of Laurier Community Music graduates and students for this interactive musical workshop. Learn about their research and work in this new field.

Full lecture description here...

Presented by

Brandon Leis, Community Music, Faculty of Music

 Register

What Does it Mean to Indigenize Education?

March 14, 2018

7 PM

Location: FirstOntario Arts Centre Milton, 1010 Main Street East, Milton (MinMaxx Hall) 

The relationship between Canada and its First Peoples is damaged. How do we begin to repair the damage of 500 years of Colonization?  Wilfrid Laurier's new Indigenous Curriculum Specialist, Erin Hodson, believes it is through education.  Discover what it means to Indigenize education for an entire University.

Full lecture description here...

Presented by

Erin Hodson, Indigenous Curriculum Specialist, Wilfrid Laurier University

 

  Register

The Myth Of The Age Of Entitlement: Millennials, Austerity, And Hope

April 11, 2018

7 PM

Location: FirstOntario Arts Centre Milton, 1010 Main Street East, Milton (Mattamy Theatre) 

Have you heard that we are living in the age of entitlement? Scholars and pundits declare that millennials expect special treatment, do whatever they feel like, and think they deserve to have things handed to them. This lecture will peel back the layers of the entitlement myth, expose its faults and redefine entitlement as a fundamental concept for realizing economic and environmental justice.

Full lecture description here...

Presented by

Dr. James Cairns, Social and Environmental Justice, Faculty of Liberal Arts

 Register

 

Just Trying to Fit in: The Importance of Friendship for Immigrant Youth in Canada

May 9, 2018

7 PM

Location: FirstOntario Arts Centre Milton, 1010 Main Street East, Milton (MinMaxx Hall) 

The key to belonging is friendship. Making friends across ethnic groups during the adolescent years should be easy and natural, but it is not. Canadian research examining friendship and social interaction between immigrant and non-immigrant youth suggest that stories of acceptance are the exception rather than the norm. This lecture examines the central role that friendship plays in the lives of immigrant youth and the interactions between immigrant adolescents and their Canadian-born peers at school.  

Full lecture description here...

Presented by

Dr. Stacey Wilson-Forsberg, Department of Human Rights and Human Diversity, Faculty of Liberal Arts

Register

 

 

Admission: Free

Partners

The lecture series is a partnership between the Town of Milton, Wilfrid Laurier University and the Milton Public Library.

The Town and Laurier have a memorandum of understanding (MOU) in place with the intent of establishing a university campus on a 150-acre site within the Milton Education Village.

Overview

Wilfrid Laurier has long supported the public role of academics to bring their knowledge and thinking outside of the classroom. The Laurier Milton Lecture Series provides a wonderful opportunity to engage in a public dialogue with residents of Milton on a broad array of important topics.

The presentations showcase a range of the current research being conducted at Laurier, and include members from a number of different Faculties, representing departments and programs from across the University.

Biographies of Presenters

Dr. Kim P. Roberts

Dr.  Roberts is Head of the Child Memory and Learning Lab at Wilfrid Laurier University and a Professor in the Department of Psychology. Prior to joining Laurier, Dr. Roberts worked for five years at the National Institute of Health in Bethesda Maryland, while the NICHD interviewing protocol was being developed. She has worked with police and social workers in the US, Canada, Australia, and Britain, and taught the Child Development component of the Interviewing Offences Against Children course at the Ontario Police College for eight years. She also has developed community-research partnerships with police and social workers whereby she trains expert interviewing skills. She received the Premier's Research Excellence Award for her work on children's testimony, has served as a parliamentary witness on child safety issues, and published over 50 scientific articles on child development.

Dr. Scott Nicholson

Dr. Nicholson is Professor and Director of the Game Design and Development program at Wilfrid Laurier University in Brantford, Ontario, Canada.  He also directs the Brantford Games Network and the BGNlab, which brings together students, gamers, community members, game companies, and organizations that support learning to create transformative games.  His primary research areas are escape rooms and other live-action games that bring people together for educational or team-building purposes, as well as other forms of meaningful gamification.

Dr. Mark Humphries

Dr. Mark Humphries is the Director of the Laurier Centre for Military, Strategic and Disarmament Studies (LCMSDS) and the Dunkley Chair in War and the Canadian Experience at Wilfrid Laurier University. He has published six books and more than a dozen articles on the medical, social, and operational history of the Great War.

Dr. Al-Abadleh

Dr. Al-Abadleh is a Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Laurier.  Her award-winning research programs are in atmospheric chemistry, geochemistry and environmental remediation. Dr. Al-Abadleh completed her PhD degree at the University of Iowa (2003) followed by postdoctoral training at Northwestern University (2005). Through her research, teaching and outreach activities, Dr. Al-Abadleh is passionate about highlighting chemistry's role in explaining environmental problems and transitioning humanity to a more sustainable future. 

Dr. Riemer

Dr. Riemer is an Associate Professor of community psychology and sustainability science at Wilfrid Laurier University and the Director of the Centre for Community, Research, Learning and Action and the Community, Environment and Justice Research Group. He is also the Associate Director of the Viessmann Excellence in Resilience Research Centre (VERC). A main focus of his research and teaching is the psychology of sustainability. Dr. Riemer applies community and other psychology principles, theories, and tools to address issues related to sustainability, including global climate change mitigation and resiliency, with a special interest in environmental justice and engagement in environmental action.

Brandon Leis, M.A., H.B.Mus, Op.Dip

Brandon is a vocal instructor at Laurier and the first graduate of the Masters in Community Music program. Brandon's research interests focus on how community music theories and practices can be applied in established faith-based communities. He also looks at how community music principles can serve as catalysts for reconciliation in contexts of alienation, and how community music addresses matters of self, agency and identity.

Brandon has been at the Faculty of Music at Wilfrid Laurier University for the last 8 years, teaching voice, vocal techniques and vocal pedagogy. Last year, he helped to develop and teach in the new undergraduate Community Music program. Brandon also serves as Artistic Director of the Menno Singers choir, the director of music at Stirling Avenue Mennonite Church, and is an active oratorio/concert soloist, adjudicator and workshop facilitator.

Erin Hodson, M.Ed

Erin Hodson is Wilfrid Laurier's newly appointed Indigenous Curriculum Specialist. She received her MEd with a focus on the Social and Cultural Context of Education from Brock University in 2017. For almost 10 years, Erin worked for the Tecumseh Centre for Aboriginal Research and Education where she created and taught courses focusing on Canadian history through the understanding of the Indigenous peoples of Turtle Island. Erin has been involved in several research projects investigating the state of Indigenous education in Canada. During her research, Erin has witnessed firsthand the benefits of engaging with Indigenous culture for both her own people's sense of self within mainstream education and for benefit of non-Indigenous people. Erin has been an outspoken advocate for including Indigenous content throughout all levels of education and is greatly looking forward to assisting Laurier's staff and faculty in incorporating Indigenous practices and content into their teaching methods. 

Dr. James Cairns

Dr. Cairns is Associate Professor of Social and Environmental Justice at Laurier Brantford. His book The Myth of the Age of Entitlement was published by the University of Toronto Press in July 2017. James was coordinator of Laurier's MA program in Social and Environmental Justice in 2016-17. He enjoys reading novels, running, and drinking coffee. James is the co-author (with Alan Sears) of two previous books: The Democratic Imagination, and A Good Book in Theory.

Dr. Stacey Wilson-Forsberg

Stacey Wilson-Forsberg is an Associate Professor in the Human Rights Human Diversity program at Wilfrid Laurier University's Brantford campus. Stacey's research broadly focuses on immigration and multiculturalism. She is especially interested in the experiences of immigrant youth in schools and smaller communities, migrants with precarious immigration status in Canada and Mexico, and the development of intercultural competence in university students. Her ongoing research includes a SSHRC-funded qualitative study of the challenges and opportunities faced by male African immigrant youth when attempting to access the support they need to make informed decisions about post-secondary education in Ontario. She is also researching a collection of narratives by Central American migrants transiting through Mexico. Recent publications include a textbook published by Oxford University Press edited with Laurier colleague Andrew M. Robinson called Immigrant Youth in Canada: Theoretical Approaches, Practical Issues, and Professional Perspectives. Prior to joining the faculty of Wilfrid Laurier University, Stacey worked for several years in the government and non-governmental sectors in a number of areas including: Canada's foreign policy toward Latin America and the Caribbean, North American integration, the inclusion of non-governmental actors in multilateral organizations and summits, social policy and poverty eradication, and more recently, foreign qualification recognition.

Full Lecture Summary

Forensic Psychology: Crime Through the Eyes of a Child

Dr. Kim P. Roberts, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Science

A child's description about an event they have observed or participated in can often be crucial evidence during an investigation and court proceedings. In some cases, the child's testimony is the only evidence available. Forensic interviewers therefore shoulder a responsibility to question children in an age-appropriate fashion while maintaining the standards of the law. Research conducted over the past three decades has provided an arsenal of knowledge and interviewing tools uniquely suited to obtaining accurate and complete testimony from children. Evidence from across the globe, however, clearly shows that child interviewing is generally of poor quality and does not adhere to the developmentally-appropriate guidelines supported by the research. In this lecture, I will discuss the main issues surrounding child forensic interviewing (e.g., memory and language limitations, suggestibility) and how interviewers can maximize their chances of obtaining the quality evidence that is needed to prosecute those who commit crimes against children. 

Making Games to Change the World

Dr. Scott Nicholson, Department of Game Design and Development, Faculty of Human and Social Sciences

While games can be used as purely recreational activities, they can be much more powerful.  Games can educate and inform, build empathy and awareness, and can train and encourage new behaviours.  The Game Design and Development program at Wilfrid Laurier University's Brantford campus is focused on creating Games that Change the World.   Join Dr. Scott Nicholson, program director, as he explores the challenges and techniques they use to create board and card games, digital games, and even live-action games like escape rooms to make a difference in the world.  Learn about gamification and game-based learning, the psychological concepts used in designing games, and how students work with organizations to make games designed to motivate and educate.   

The Making of General Sir Arthur Currie

Dr. Mark Humphries, Department of History, Faculty of Arts

Historian Mark Humphries explores how a farm boy from Southwestern Ontario rose to become one of the British Army's most respected generals as well as the dark secret he feared would destroy his reputation. 

Global Climate Change: How We Got Here and the Way Out

Dr. Hind Al-Abadleh, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Science and Dr. Manuel Riemer, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Science

Global climate change is easily classified as the biggest challenge facing humanity in the 21st century.  The amplified greenhouse effect from burning fossil fuels resulted in raising surface and ocean temperatures, increasing acidity levels of oceans and rates of species migrations and extinction.  This presentation will discuss the physical and chemical causes of climate change in the context of key historical environmental crises since the industrial revolution, namely acid rain and the ozone hole. Following this discussion of the physical dimension, we will explore the human dimension of climate change. How did we get ourselves into this trouble? How is climate change impacting humans? Why are many of us not acting to create change even though we are aware of the likely consequences of inaction? How can we engage people in taking action? What are the things you personally can do to support your actions on climate change?

Sharing Love Through Community Music

Brandon Leis, Faculty of Music

 The origins of Community Music can be attributed to work in the United Kingdom, where the intervention of music amongst at-risk youth is a means to create positive change in their development. Presently, Community Music is used in a range of community contexts to promote positive social change. Both the undergraduate and Master's degree programs in Community Music at Laurier are on the international forefront when it comes to this innovative field of study. Join Laurier Faculty member Brandon Leis and a panel of recent Laurier Community Music graduates and current students as they discuss the research they have done and the work they are currently doing as it relates to the newly established field of Community Music. The presentation will also include a Q&A with the panelists and an interactive musical workshop.

What Does It Mean to Indigenize Education?

Erin Hodson, Indigenous Curriculum Specialist, Wilfrid Laurier University

In the summer of 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission released its Final Report and the 94 Calls to Action. I watched in awe as Senator Murray Sinclair read out all 94 Calls and wept.  That was the moment that we as Indigenous people across Turtle Island had been waiting for. That moment was the first step on the long road to making things better, but it also opened up so much hurt in our collective hearts as we realized just how damaged the relationship between Canada and its First Peoples really was and still is.  The question today remains; how do we fix it?  How do we begin to repair the damage of 500 years of Colonization?  My personal answer: through education.  As Wilfrid Laurier's new Indigenous Curriculum Specialist I have been asked many times what it means to Indigenize education and how I will do this for the entire University.  First, it is not going to happen any time soon, and before anything else, we must get to know each other.   

The Myth Of The Age Of Entitlement: Millennials, Austerity, And Hope

Dr. James Cairns, Social and Environmental Justice, Faculty of Liberal Arts

We are said to be living in the age of entitlement. Scholars and pundits declare that millennials expect special treatment, do whatever they feel like, and think they deserve to have things handed to them. In this lecture, I'll peel back the layers of the entitlement myth, exposing its faults and arguing that the majority of millennials are actually disentitled, facing bleak economic prospects and potential ecological disaster. I'll redefine entitlement as a fundamental concept for realizing economic and environmental justice.

Just Trying to Fit in: The Importance of Friendship for Immigrant Youth in Canada

Stacey Wilson-Forsberg, Department of Human Rights and Human Diversity, Faculty of Liberal Arts

Immigrant parents generally seek the economic goal of finding a suitable job upon arrival in a new country so that they can adjust to their new environment and support their family. Their adolescent children, however, want more than anything to "fit in" or belong in their new community and specifically at school. The key to belonging is friends. Making friends with other immigrant youth, and especially those from the same ethnic background, is comforting and familiar. However, friendship with native-born youth is also important. Making friends across ethnic groups during the adolescent years should be easy and natural, but it is not. In fact, the small body of Canadian research examining friendship formation and social interaction between immigrant youth and non-immigrant youth suggests that stories of immigrant youth feeling accepted by Canadian-born peers are the exception rather than the norm. This presentation will examine the central role that friends play in immigrant youth's search for belonging in the receiving society. First-generation immigrant youth who immigrated to Canada as older children (over the age of 12) are the primary focus. The presentation will pay particular attention to interactions between immigrant adolescents and their Canadian-born peers at school.